What’s In A Like?

Nowadays, any piece of submitted content on the Internet has some way of reciprocating a response, a way of interacting with the creator. There are likes, dislikes, retweets, reblogs, comments, shares, reaction buttons, plus ones, and so much more. We are encouraged to connect and show some love (or hate) for our fellow users.

But what does this all really mean?

Are there any special awards given out for having the most likes? Not that I know of.

It’s a frivolous thing in my mind because you don’t usually remember that like after having moved on with your day. It gets lost in the shuffle with all of the other meandering things going on.

What was the first thing I ever liked on the Internet? I could not tell you. It would have to be on Facebook because MySpace didn’t have likes and YouTube was still using the star rating system at the time. Maybe it was one of my own posts because I was so desperate for attention back then and the online world was a great way for me to branch out.

I suppose it really serves as a way of validating something, showing that you care enough to provide feedback. Without all of the rating and sharing options, there wouldn’t be any social experience. Liking blog posts tells readers that the post was read and they got something from it (most of the time). You know who is reading and who cares.

 

Frivolous 

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Author: Macbofisbil

Welcome to "Macbofisbil: An Awesome Mind", a place where you will find all sorts of interesting stories, pictures, and advice on life in general.

One thought on “What’s In A Like?”

  1. But it’s the comments that tell you something.
    The first article I wrote on wordpress received four likes, I think, but zero views.
    And I was frantically googling what on earth that meant. In the end I decided that likes are meaningless, that it is really the views and the comments that count.

    It’s very easy to breeze through your reader, and press like on everything in the hopes someone responds by viewing your own blog; quite another to create engagement elsewhere, to know your fellow bloggers and build something great for another.

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